Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Friday, July 6, 2012

Aug. 19, 1965: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. answers questions during news conference at Los Angeles City Hall. Mayor Samuel W. Yorty, right, listens with hands over his eyes. Yorty later criticized Dr. King's suggestion that Police Chief William H. Parker resign following LAPD actions during the 1965 riots in Los Angeles. This photo was published in the Aug. 20, 1965 LA Times.



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

16 Aug 1965, Los Angeles, California, USA --- 8/16/1965-Los Angeles, CA: The War In The West: Black smoke darkens the sky over Southeast Los Angeles, during the fourth day of the six day rioting in the Negro area. Fires burned over a wide area along with looting and violence in the Nation's worst Negro riot in two decades, which was sparked off August 12th. (Original Caption) --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

Watt's Towers



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

Watts Towers



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

1960's



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

"THE" Alternative " W the Movie". c. 2005-2008 Pink and Blue Films. Directed by Alfred Eaker and Ross St. Just.Produced by Alfred Eaker,Whitney Eaker, Wendy Collin Sorin, Steven Sorrin and Ernest Stewart.Starring Alfred Eaker as George W. Bush and BlueMahler.PinkFreud as herself and Jezebel.John M. Bennett as Texas Oil ManGary Pierce as Saddam.Brother Brown as UncaSama Ben Llama.Jason Hignite as Johnny McPainJohn Loyd as Barak OsamaSteven Gray as Jeb Head.Mikey the Puppet as Little Michael Moore.Mindy Steele as Lady Ann Palin.Joe Shearer critic Indy.com, Indianapolis Star:" 'W the Movie' is a surreal cartoonish underground take on the second Bush Presidency. 'W the Movie' is nightmarish, provocative and imaginative. Portrays George W. Bush as a cruel, sadistic, psychopathic tyrant. Best character: Eaker as BlueMahler, a freethinker who dares to take on a tyrannical government. '



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

Hollywood's "Jungle Girl" (As If) - Jet Magazine Feb 14, 1952



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

Racial Violence Flares In Cairo, Illinois - Jet Magazine Feb 14, 1952



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

Atlanta's Grady Hospital Attempted Suicide - Jet Magazine Feb 14, 1952



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

Visitors at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis listen as recording of a bus driver "threatens" figure of Rosa Parks, left, seated in the front of the bus. The bus, a real Montgomery, Ala., city bus of the 1950s, is one of the displays at the museum, formerly the Lorraine Motel, where Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated in 1968. Visiting the bus are, from left front, Sheritha and Quanitha Cobb; at rear, Jerry Mack and Arlene Cobb, all from Dallas, Tex. (AP Photo)



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

Internet picture (view from Bunker Hill Monument) "New" Dam and Locks (to left of bridge), near USS Constitution and downsteam of original facilities.Leonard P. Zakim Bunker Hill Memorial Bridge (2002) was built as part of "the Big Dig Project"; the largest and most expensive ($22 billion) highway construction project in the US to reroute the main highway through the heart of the city into 5.6 km tunnel.Its name commemorates both Boston civic leader and civil rights activist, who championed "building bridges between peoples", and the Battle of Bunker Hill.It is the widest "cable-stayed" ("harp" design) bridge in the world carrying 10 lanes of Interstate 93 over the Charles River (i.e. 2 outer lanes are cantilevered outside of the wires and 8 lanes run through the towers). It was a replacement for the Charlestown High Bridge; an older truss bridge constructed in the 1950s.The cables suggest a ship in full sail and also evoke the history of East Boston as a center of shipbuilding.



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

VERNON JORDANVernon Eulion Jordan, Jr. (born August 15, 1935) is a lawyer and business executive in the United States. He served as a close adviser to President Bill Clinton and has become known as an influential figure in American politics. An African American, Jordan has been a leading figure in the civil rights movement. Jordan lived in Atlanta, Georgia during the 1950s, where he earned money for college as chauffeur to former mayor Robert Maddox. He was an honor graduate of David Tobias Howard High School. He graduated from DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana, in 1957.[1] He earned a law degree at Howard University School of Law in 1960. He is a member of the Omega Psi Phi and Sigma Pi Phi fraternities.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vernon_Jordan



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

Harry BelafonteHarold George "Harry" Belafonte, Jr. (originally Belafonete; born March 1, 1927) is an American musician, singer, actor, and social activist. One of the most successful pop singers in history, he was dubbed the "King of Calypso" -- a title which he was very reluctant to accept (according to the documentary Calypso Dreams) -- for popularizing the Caribbean musical style with an international audience in the 1950s. Belafonte is perhaps best known for singing the "Banana Boat Song", with its signature lyric "Day-O." Throughout his career, he has been an advocate for civil rights and humanitarian causes, and was a vocal critic of the policies of the George W. Bush Administration.



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

First African Baptist Church (Franklin Square)The oldest black congregation in North America, dating from 1777. The founding pastor was George Liele, who was the first black Baptist in Georgia. The building pictured was erected in 1859 and built almost entirely by the members of the congregation, most of whom were enslaved at that point in our history. It was a key staging area for the Underground Railroad and a nerve center of the early civil rights movement in Savannah in the early 1950s.



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

Malcolm XBorn Malcolm Little in 1925, Malcolm X changed his name while serving time in prison, where he was introduced to the Muslim religion and the teachings of Nation of Islam founder Elijah Muhammad. The X, he said, symbolized the true African family name that he could never know. During the 1950s, he was instrumental in increasing the membership in the Nation of Islam and became known for has aggressive approach to addressing the inequities between black and white Americans. Unlike King and his associates in the civil rights movement, who advocated a nonviolent approach to achieving equality, Malcolm X espoused the rejection of whites and advocated "armed self-defense" as the best strategy to win freedom, justice and equality.



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

As a new sophomore at a boarding school in the 1950s, Rob Garrett, a young black man, is witness to the persecution of other students and wonders about the growing civil rights movement back home in Virginia.



Illustration and creation by ms. Lisa C. Jackson

Birdia Keglar painting; killed in 1966 with Adlena Hamlett; both voting rights advocates in the 1950s and 1960s